AUGUST THEME: Spaces

Forums Monthly Theme AUGUST THEME: Spaces

This topic contains 79 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Peter Robinson Peter Robinson 3 years, 3 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 80 total)
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  • #7509
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    One of the advantages of mirrorless cameras, as we have said elsewhere, is that a short lens to sensor distance  means plenty of room for an adaptor. The one Ian is using was quite inexpensive, so you can have a play with these old lenses, some of which are very good ( for example, many of the current Canon lenses on sale ere designed a long time back). Sharpness or (better) detail rendition has not improved that much, development has been in contrast, colour rendition, image stabilisation, zooms and auto- focus.

    In using a Fuji X I am realising there are many advantages to “mirrorless” cameras.  I am sure that if film had never existed and we had started with digital we would never have seen SLRs develop as much as they did, they simply would not have been necessary. Having a great mirror having to be moved out of the way before exposure can take place – it is a miracle that they work.

    Do you all use the depth of field switch on your DSLRS? That is the switch which plunges you into darkness and purports to show you what your depth of field really looks like by stopping down the lens to your chosen stop rather than the maximum aperture you are viewing through.  This is not needed on a mirrorless camera, you see what you are actually going to get if using a EVF.

    But there is a way to go; shutter lag is still present, focussing is too slow. I don’t know why, perhaps  it is just a question of development.

     

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 4 months ago by Profile photo of John Royle ajroyle.
    #7512
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    There are technical reasons why autofocus on DSLRs is faster than on mirrorless cameras: DSLRs have a separate phase-detection sensor just for the auto-focus system, whereas mirrorless cameras use either the contrast-detection method or, in the case of Fuji X cameras, use some phase-detection pixels on the main sensor, both of which are inherently slower  than the DSLR’s dedicated system.

    Of course, if you’re using M42 ‘legacy’ lenses, you have to focus them manually, just the way we always used to on film cameras – except that the assistance of focus-peaking highlights for  manual focussing on Fuji X cameras make this so much easier than it was on an old film SLR! 🙂

    #7513
    Profile photo of KEN LAST
    Anonymous

    HOW MUCH FASTER I SAY????? Using the “touch screen” auto focus/auto exposure/and take the photo on my Samsung NX 300 its like instant the tip of my finger all of these actions really instant-in practical terms it would be immeasurable.

    #7515
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Three spaces

    Another Helios-44 shot.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 4 months ago by Profile photo of Ian McNab Ian McNab.
    #7518
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    DSLRs have had perhaps 40 years start on mirror-less cameras in developing  auto- focus technology, so it is not surprising they are ahead. At present the top DSLRs are  ahead on speed and  quality which makes them first choice for nature and sport.

    But I am straying from the subject of this thread.  Mervin’s shot still takes the biscuit  for concentrating so much meaning into a tiny space!

    #7526
    Profile photo of KEN LAST
    Anonymous

    sure does

    #7530
    Profile photo of Mervin Heywood
    Mervin Heywood
    Participant

    I’m loving the recent images, everyone seems to have settled into religious or paganistic iconography. I do love a good church or churchyard shot and celtic imagery is also a favourite.

    John >>> I like the gravestone shot, there’s a nice counterbalance between the 3 gravestones, the 3 pillars and the spaces in between them.

    Ian >>> I like “Three spaces” for the way the timber has split to create more spaces which link together the 3 holes.

    I’ve been in York for a couple of days so I’m hoping to be able to post a couple more photos before the end of the month, quite possible more religious imagery from the Minster.

    #7531
    Profile photo of Mervin Heywood
    Mervin Heywood
    Participant

    Dangerous spaces

    #7532
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Another engaging diagonal composition, Merv, with strong repetition of the forms across the frame. (And threes, of course, are good!)

    #7535
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Wobbly spaces


    Having played with John’s Helios-44, I was so impressed that I bought, from another friend, a Helios-44-2 (one made in 1975 at the Valdai Optical-Mechanical Factory in Russia), which I used on my Fuji X-E2 to take this picture.

    #7536
    Profile photo of KEN LAST
    Anonymous

    Lots of people are buying the Helios , realising that its such a good lens. Many variants.The 44-2 could experience some flare. 44- m4-5-6-7—multi coated 6 blades. Earlier were non coated -8 blades. And this is an f2 lens and like 90mm equiv. on digital.Speaks for itself – optically copied of a famous CZ lens- it has to be good. I find it so interesting that from all the lenses of decades ago-this is the one in demand. I knew on my old Zenith 45 years ago that the lens was a bit special.Good on yer Ian–nice treat.————–As we know the Russians poached the German lens technology (nice for us) whereas they gave it to the Japanese as allies.Completes the circle.—-Go on Ian–do us a portrait.

    #7538
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Ken >>> You’re right, the 44-2 isn’t multi-coated, so it’s a bit low contrast, especially when shooting towards the sun (quite apart from the flare you mention). But it’s the most sought-after variant because of the unusual ‘swirly bokeh’ you can get in the backgrounds of portraits under the right conditions. I’m still experiment to get this effect to order, so a portrait may have to wait a while! 😉

    (And I promise to put any portraits more appropriately in ‘All About Photography’ – or even Kit Chat – rather than here, where I shouldn’t be clogging up the discussion with all this talk of legacy lenses! Sorry, folks!)

    #7549
    Profile photo of D. Williams
    D. Williams
    Participant

    Sardines

    Mind the Gap.

    #7550
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Brilliant evocations of the theme, Dee – and good ‘street’ photographs, too!

    (Black and white? Excellent! Have you come over to the Dark Side? 😉 )

    #7552
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    The one of the  chap looking strIght at you is good, for this topic it is apt because of the space he has around him. The other  is a good social comment  about tube travel, the way nobody speaks and “keeps their distance”.  Colour? You don’t need it in work like this, do you? It is likely to get in the way by distracting from the shapes,  body language and interactions which make the appeal of street photography composition.

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