Click Moments

Forums Critique Requests Click Moments

This topic contains 6 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Ian McNab Ian McNab 2 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #8979
    Profile photo of Peter Robinson
    Peter Robinson
    Keymaster

    Ian gave us an interesting talk a couple of weeks ago in which he talked about ‘click’ moments. Pressing the shutter at prcisely the right right moment to get your picture. A second either side and the picture would be lost. This is particularly true for sport and action shots and street photography, not not so relevent for subjects like still life and landscapes. I’ve dug out a few from my archives that I think meet this criteria. It would be interesting to see other members interuptation of ‘click moments’. You may have seen these before.

     

    #8980
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    I love the first one, Peter. The girls’ flying hair and legs, their terrified grip on the bar and their expressions all convey the speed and excitement of the moment. (The girl nearest to us even looks as though she’s had a strange red ‘hat’ blown off her head in the rush.) And the cherry on the cake is that surreal face peering directly at us from under the front of the car! A brilliant moment to have clicked the shutter.

    The last one is superbly bizarre – a helpless man suspended inches from the ground by some unearthly invisible force, while a bloke in blue shorts looks on in a relaxed pose, his hands casually in his pockets, but a couple of women in the middle of the background have their hands raised to their mouths as if in horror. So many possible readings – and none of them convincingly right.

    #8981
    Profile photo of KEN LAST
    Anonymous

    Yes All spot on the button Peter,  the aircraft is so spot on the second—split second timing perfect as there would be a few milli seconds from pressing the shutter to activation. They are as close as it gets- they judge this much the same as us driving and using the kerb ahead to track round a bend–they use the smoke trail in that way. Good stuff.

    #8982
    Profile photo of Peter Robinson
    Peter Robinson
    Keymaster

    Thanks for your comments guys. When you take photos like this you never know what you’re going to get. There’s always a delay between thinking, pressing the shutter and the mirror rising (in a DSLR) and the shutter opening. Many moons ago a remember reading an article in ‘Camera User’ magazine about VAT. No not Value Added Tax, but Visualisation Anticipation and Timing which discussed the theme. It was all thinking what’s going to happen, waiting for it to happen and  pressing the shutter at the right time.

    In the last photograph you can’t tell in which direction the guy is travelling. He could be falling straight to the ground, but he was actually break dancing and twisting horizontally so no harm was done in taking these pictures.  Anyone got any click moments to show us?

    #8984
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Peter’s description of the last photo is particularly interesting (“you can’t tell in which direction the guy is travelling”). It is exactly what Winogrand meant when he said “…there isn’t a photograph in the world that has any narrative ability. Any of ’em. They do not tell stories – they show you what something looks like. To a camera.”

    You’ve already seen several of my ‘moments’ in the short talk I gave, which Peter mentioned. Here are a few more. (I think it’s important to remember that not all such moments are dramatic: some can be quite subtle.)

    (You can click a photo for a larger version on black background)

     

     

    #8986
    Profile photo of Peter Robinson
    Peter Robinson
    Keymaster

    Yes  Ian, these all capture a fleeting moment well. I like the humour in the first and the way the lady absorbed into her phone seems unaware of the gushing water. The second caught the girl’s expression as she imagines she’s burning some rubber. The third one freezes the moment of contact between the child’s hand and the flower while the forth shot shows the detail of the morris dancers in mid air.

    #8990
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Thanks, Peter. Like you, I thought the texter’s absorption with her phone during the spectacular drenching going on next to her was a Monty Python moment. I think my favourite is the little girl ever-so-carefully touching the flower to see how it feels – the picture really captures the wonder of a toddler’s exploration of all the new things in her world.

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