DECEMBER THEME: "At this time of year"

Forums Monthly Theme DECEMBER THEME: "At this time of year"

This topic contains 68 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Ian McNab Ian McNab 2 years, 9 months ago.

Viewing 9 posts - 61 through 69 (of 69 total)
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  • #8580
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Yes, lightening the shadows was, as I feared, apt to screw up the overall tonal balance.

    Sadly, I also fear that ‘natural’ rather than ‘dramatic’ won’t win you many prizes in competitions. It appears that we all have to make a choice about what matters for the integrity of our own work.

    #8581
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Yes, lightening the shadows was apt to screw up the overall tonal balance.

    Sadly, I also fear that ‘natural’ rather than ‘dramatic’ won’t win you many prizes in competitions. (I guess we all have to make a choice about what matters for the integrity of our own work.)

    #8582
    Profile photo of KEN LAST
    Anonymous

    Number four is still a super photo. Let it roll on its strengths you could well hit on a judge who will –like me–be wowed with the sky and receding hills –crop a tad of the base- a smart judge will like the  lead in through the dark hills to the superb receding hills. This is a good photo Peter. BTW–Simon  and Carol have a 15 week old puppy Fox red Lab  called  Sam.—————–had a thought Peter—number four–crop of the left side up to the V indentation in the left black foreground and some off the base–leaving a small amount of the dark water before it lightens. 

    #8585
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    New scarf for Christmas

    Fuji X-E2 + SMC Takumar 50mm f/1.4

    f/2.8, 1/140s, ISO 200

    #8587
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    Now who wouldn’t be delighted to get a response like that for a gift?

    Peter>>>>>>>I think No4 has it in the end. You’ve drawn some good comments there I hope you found them useful!

    #8589
    Profile photo of Peter Robinson
    Peter Robinson
    Keymaster

    Yes John, many thanks to everyone for their constructive thoughts.

    You’ve caught the moment there Ian. A delightful shot.

    #8592
    Profile photo of meg cumming
    meg cumming
    Participant

    One happy little lady.

    #8593
    Profile photo of KEN LAST
    Anonymous

    BEAUTIFUL—TAKES THE BISCUIT–BEST SAVED TILL LAST- FINISH THE YEAR IN STYLE IAN—MAGIC -CLASS–WELL DONE.

    #8594
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Thanks very much, everyone, for your kind comments.

    I was struck by Peter’s remark, “You’ve caught the moment there Ian”, as it seemed to nail one of the essentials things that distinguishes photography from other ways of making pictures. You see, I was a bit nervous about posting the picture, as it could easily be thought of – and dismissed? – as a ‘mere’ family snap (and almost certainly would be by some judges in club competitions); whereas it was, in fact, a quite carefully anticipated, timed, and framed photograph to capture and express the feeling of the moment.

    Making a picture like this is something that only photography can do, because it is essentially about ‘freezing an instant’ – the particular property that characterises making a picture with a camera that photography theorists call ‘instantianeity’ (serious, they do!). I’m not sure it’s an important quality of all photographs (even though it’s always present): for me, it plays a major role only in particular kinds of picture made with a camera – ones where the state of an action or of the light or of a dynamic pattern is only as it is for the instant when the shutter is pressed. Peter’s landscapes (above) have something of that property, particularly the first one with its crepuscular rays. Jane Bown’s portraits that we have recently been looking at have this property in spades.

    Other sorts of pictures – still life, formal portraits, fashion pictures, many routine landscapes, studio photographs, etc – don’t really depend on what singles out the camera as a picture-making tool, but could as well – if not better – have been made by drawing or painting (if only one had the skill, of course!).

    We’ve been talking about these matters elsewhere on the forum – particularly in the discussions about Garry Winogrand, who was especially interested in the time-freezing and detail-capturing that only cameras bring to picture-making. (I notice I now find myself checking the ‘photographic’ credentials of competition pictures by asking myself, ‘Could that picture only have been made with a camera rather than by painting?’ And quite often the answer is ‘No’.)

    Anyway, thanks again for being so kind about my ‘family snap’ 😉

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 9 months ago by Profile photo of Ian McNab Ian McNab.
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