DECEMBER THEME: "Light And Dark"

Forums Monthly Theme DECEMBER THEME: "Light And Dark"

This topic contains 68 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Peter Robinson Peter Robinson 4 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #2225
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    The theme for November – “Through The Window” – is now closed.

    Please chose one of your November images as a ‘final entry’ – the one you think is your best image from the month. Edit the title of your chosen image by inserting “November Entry – ” in front of its title (e.g. November Entry – Climbing Through The Window).

     

    The theme for December 2012 is

    Light And Dark

    Let’s see lots of images!

    Post your images as replies to this post. (Make sure you’ve read the Guidelines first.)

    Have fun!

     

     

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    • This topic was modified 4 years, 10 months ago by Profile photo of Ian McNab Ian McNab.
    #2338
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    When I saw this I hoped to make something of it but the texture of the road is a bit distracting.

     

    Black and White

    #2341
    Profile photo of Peter Robinson
    Peter Robinson
    Keymaster

    Well done for kicking this off John. I’ve been struggling to come up with something and am still searching. I think it shows that a simple image like this can produce an interesting photo. There’s texture and detail in the dark and light areas and the best bit of me is the black and white cats. Or does it just look like a white cat as it’s in B&W? I expect you could have taken this from many different angles and still have got a good picture. Did you try different versions. I would like to read Mac analysis.

    #2342
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Lots of lights and darks there, John, and great composition. A fine example!

    #2343
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    There are many different approaches, you could try to make as few tones as possible to make it more graphic and emphasise the idea of BLACK and WHITE. The point of the image is that we have a black cat and a white cat sitting just on the boundary between light and shade.

    I  am  using Lightroom primarily now and then Topaz plug-ins as needed. I use PSE when work in layers is needed, or precise sizing. I have to go back into Lightroom to print – I am very pleased with what it does in that department – far more possibilities than PS on sizing and a very effective control of the lightness of the final print. I find I can now get something nearer than ever to what is on my monitor.

    I would recommend Lightroom plus PSE now, you can buy both for little more than 1/6 the price of Photoshop, so definitely a good idea for the impecunious!

    #2345
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Pete >>> Here’s one way of construing the composition:

     

     

    The white cat is positioned on one of the ‘eyes’ of the rectangle (which is cropped 3.71:6 rather than 4:6 as a standard 35mm format would be).

    The back of the black cat lies along one of the diagonals of the upper half of the frame.

    But perhaps the most important compositional device is that the other diagonal, which is helping to locate the ‘eye’ that’s on the white cat, is roughly parallel to the edge of the shadow;  and the same is true of the corresponding diagonal in the lower half of the frame. It’s this geometrical coherence and repetition that helps tie the image together. It also emphasis the meaning as John describes – the black and white cats connected with the shadow and light. So you actually couldn’t do this as well from any other position – John has chosen exactly the right point of view and framing to make the connections in the image work really well.

    (BTW, in most images, the geometry is somewhat approximate: most photographers – even very good ones – don’t quite get the millimeter accuracy that Cartier-Bresson managed to achieve in the geometry of his compositions!  When it comes to compositional geometry, you have to think of a camera as a paint roller rather then a fine three-bristle brush!)

    It’ll be interesting to hear whether I’ve understood what John himself was actually doing with this!

    #2346
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    Not quite so many lines of contruction in mind but you are right about the placement of the cats. It is a shame that there is a “step” in the shadow but it does at least follow the same line.

    #2348
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Yes, I assumed that in practice you’d  just paid attention to the position of the cats and the diagonal slopes of the shadows. The other compositon lines are just to make the analysis clearer.

    #2350
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    In the late sixties  while commisioning   St. Mary”s  Hospital  Manchester–Janet–my young assistant   was such a wise person–and often stopped me exploding –saying “don”t rise to the bait” —phew.      Now this is what I think—wots is name—carlton blesson–  I think somehow   his “photo composition”   has become mixed up with his sailing plotting  course for his longtitudes and latitudes. Now only ” my opinion”.  I suspect the truth is   that only  equiped with only  a 20mm lens  JR could not move in as the cats would have   done a runner. Had he remembered the boy scouts motto “Be Prepared” he would have had   to hand a very fine pristine pin sharp zoom lens –like mine.  Now  help me Delores and Peter–do you think we are being wound up–bearing in mind it is not April 1st.  Can you imagine JR putting up a photo   with that big clump top ,left–and all that foreground and sides cropped  off—  No Janet I have not risen to the bait-I can see this is a wind up.  LOL   and that does not mean lots of love.

    #2351
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    ONE I DID PREVIOUSLY   lol

    #2357
    Profile photo of D. Williams
    D. Williams
    Participant

    Now, now ken ….. don’t make me call Janet! How that poor woman must have suffered!  😉 If Zac or Sasha had seen the cats it would have been picture opp’ over!

    I have to say that as I have the memory span of a goldfish and failed CSE maths … that I do find all the charts and lines a little over my head just yet.  I usually have to work by eye and find my way through most tasks in an instinctive, creative manner rather than a mathematical one whether it is photography,  computers or business.  I do find the overlays interesting but more as an ‘after the fact’ as I do not have the training to apply or call them to mind while composing an image.  Maybe one day the penny will drop the more I read.  All interesting stuff.

    #2359
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    You’re quite right, D: Cartier-Bresson, too, worked by eye, having cultivated a highly refined sense of the geometry of composition during his many years of training as a painter.

    He agreed with what you say – that the kind of geometrical analysis I used above is only something you do ‘after the event’, to check your ‘eye’ and for the purpose of learning.

    It’s definitely not what you’re doing when you look through the viewfinder: that’s a matter of highly developed ‘seeing’. But working out the geometry of great images, and analysing your own after the event can be very helpful for cultivating your eye.

    #2379
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Well, I don’t know about you, but I’m struggling a bit with this month’s theme. Since there are so few contributions thus far, here’s an attempt. I can’t say it’s a particularly brilliant composition – it was too tricky to position the tripod to get a more elegant PoV without setting off the security lighting. But at least it’s Light and Dark!!!

     

    (It really does look better on a black background, but I couldn’t organise that this time!)

    D300s
    55mm
    f/4
    1 sec
    ISO 200
    Available light

     

    I had a second go with the same subject, a bit more creatively.  (But only a bit!)…

    D300s
    48mm
    f/2.8
    0.8 sec
    ISO 200
    Available light

     

    #2380
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    Remove the water sculpture on the right.

    #2381
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    John >>> Thanks!  Like this?…

     

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