DECEMBER THEME- SHAPES

Forums Monthly Theme DECEMBER THEME- SHAPES

This topic contains 26 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Peter Robinson Peter Robinson 11 months, 3 weeks ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 27 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #12794
    Profile photo of Peter Robinson
    Peter Robinson
    Keymaster

    The theme for November is now closed

    The theme for December is

    Shapes

    The idea of this month’s theme is to make us look at our photographs a bit deeper and think about their compositional elements. So the subject matter is open it’s the elements and how they relate to each other that we’re looking for. It would be interesting to hear how you think your composition works. Get your thinking caps on. 
    We now have a much simpler uploading process for the images you want to post. All you now do is post your picture! But we do ask that you don’t post anything too big; perhaps best to start with a typical “1400” and then, when the dialog box comes up, make it 650p wide. If it is portrait orientation make it 650p high. That’s it!

    There’s no restriction on when the photograph was taken so search though your archives show us what you can produce.

    #12798
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    The underlying compositional structure of this picture is intersecting Golden Ratio lines:

     

    There are also other contributions to the compositional coherence of the picture provided by the repetition of cylindrical shapes in the bench support and lamp column, and of short vertical and horizontal lines on the seat, in its shadow and in the paving (at bottom right and elsewhere).

     

    #12800
    Profile photo of Peter Robinson
    Peter Robinson
    Keymaster

    Thanks for kicking off this month’s theme so quickly Ian with an interesting photograph.  I see what you’re saying about the lines and I think the fact that it’s monochrome removes any colours that would distract from the composition. I like the rich blacks and good tonal range. Does it need anything else or would that confuse matters? If I took a photo like this I’d probably use the metal work as a frame for something else then it would become secondary.

    #12801
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Thanks for your comments, Peter. If you used the metal as a frame for some object or other, you’d have a different picture, probably one that was more ‘realist’ – i.e. a picture of something. But this is not a picture of something. It’s simply a picture: in this case, an abstract arrangement of elements, created by framing some stuff from a particular point of view, so that shapes are arranged in relation to one another and to the frame in a pleasing way. In this case, it was made using a camera and some stuff that was around in the street, rather as an artist might make a collage by organising some stuff that was lying around the studio and fixing it onto a canvas or backboard. This photograph is, in that way, simply a picture, not a picture of something. The closest analogy I can think of is one of Mondrian’s paintings (though his painting are in colour, rather than monochrome!):

     

    Composition C (No.III) with Red, Yellow and Blue, 1935, Piet Mondrian

    #12812
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    With acknowledgements to Tom! 😉 …

    (Click on picture to view large on black)

    #12824
    Profile photo of Peter Robinson
    Peter Robinson
    Keymaster

    Tunnel vision indeed. I do like this photograph as it obviously has depth, texture and a repeating receding pattern leading to the small but significant character in the background. I think I may have raised the camera a little to lose a touch of the foreground and include a bit more of the ceiling.

    #12830
    Profile photo of Peter Robinson
    Peter Robinson
    Keymaster

    I’ve been looking through my ‘Crewe’ folder and found these black and white photographs I took at the college a while ago. I converting them to monochrome makes them more graphical. The main shapes are circular and I’ve tried to balance the circles with the opposite end of the frame. Do you think these work or can you think how they could be improved?

     

     

    #12832
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    Those certainly fit the bill Peter. I think I remember this set of pictures. These three are really apposite as they emphasise the shapes by echoing features or by us of shadows. Every building is a collection of shapes but here you have underlined them.

    Ian, pity you have not entered the second shot in our comps this year.

    I have edited this message two or three times because yesterday one of my responses appeared three times and I’m trying to figure out what happened. Could be it is just down to the fact that they were done on a mobile phone and the tabs are difficult to see. Surprising though that the software allowed it.

     

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by Profile photo of John Royle ajroyle.
    #12835
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Thanks, Peter and John, for your comments on my ‘cloister’ photograph. Regarding Peter’s suggestion about the framing, yes, there are a number of possibilities for pictures with this sort of scene. The reason for my choice here is the Golden Spiral, which in this shot tends, I think, to emphasise the space and distance. (Forgive my rather rough drawing over the Lightroom crop overlay!):

     

    Thanks, John, for your suggestion about entering this in a club comp, but Tom has cornered the market on this sort of picture, and I wouldn’t want to fall foul of a copyright lawsuit! 😉

     

    Like John, I very much like the way Peter’s pictures play with painted lines and shadows to echo the objects in the pictures.

    #12879
    Profile photo of wbaxter
    wbaxter
    Participant

    #12881
    Profile photo of wbaxter
    wbaxter
    Participant

    I like the shapes in these images but which one has the best impact? the B&W or the colour

    #12883
    Profile photo of Peter Robinson
    Peter Robinson
    Keymaster

    I think it converts to B&W very well and that one has more impact for me.  The players seem to stand out from the background better and the trees have rendered really dark. It also looks sharper to me. I love the drama the triangular shape creates. It implies movement, action and speed. Thanks for sharing this with us Wallace.

    #12884
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    For me, the colour just ‘happens to be there’ in the world, but contributes nothing pictorially. If what you want is a record of a moment during a game of rugby, the coloured version is OK, I guess. If, on the other hand, you want a picture conveying a visually dynamic relationship between two human forms in space, then the BW version focuses the viewer’s attention on the volumes, the repeating echoing patterns of the limbs, and the coherence of the diagonal relationship that the two forms have combined to create. It’s like a wonderful photographic life drawing that delights the eye with its elegant alignments and repetitions.

    The colour just makes you flicker between some red socks and a red shirt. 🙁

     

     

    #12888
    Profile photo of wbaxter
    wbaxter
    Participant

    Thank you all for your comments, there are some great lines in the image and as Ian says there are no distractions in the B&W image. Will probably enter it in a Competition in the new year, and we will see what comments it draws from the judge, will he see the point of the lines and shapes?

    #12924
    Profile photo of wbaxter
    wbaxter
    Participant

    Shape in Nature

    Knots in Flight Mk 3 A78J4404 PDI

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 27 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.