February Theme – Portraiture

Forums Monthly Theme February Theme – Portraiture

This topic contains 44 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Pete Robinson 1 year, 6 months ago.

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  • #13588

    Pete Robinson
    Keymaster

    The theme for January is now closed

    The theme for February is

    Portraiture

    Following on from Dave and Sharon’s informative talk on portraiture during our Portrait Night I’ve decided make Portraiture February’s theme. It’s one of the classical photographic subjects that every photographer enjoys to try. So inspired by Dave and Sharon’s advice here’s your exciting opportunity to show fellow members how you create your portraits. Perhaps you’d like to try a new style and ask members if they like it or how it could be improved. This is the place improve your portraits. 

    We now have a much simpler uploading process for the images you want to post. All you now do is post your picture! But we do ask that you don’t post anything too big; perhaps best to start with a typical “1400” and then, when the dialog box comes up, make it 650p wide. If it is portrait orientation make it 650p high. That’s it!

    There’s no restriction on when the photograph was taken so search though your archives show us what you can produce. If you would like to suggest any topics for the monthly theme please let me know.

    • This topic was modified 1 year, 6 months ago by  Pete Robinson.
    #13596

    RALPH BROWES
    Participant

    The Joy of Eating

     

     

    #13597

    Pete Robinson
    Keymaster

    Thanks very much for kicking this topic off with an excellent portrait Ralph. You can read the guys thoughts as he contemplates devouring the tasty pasty. I love his expression and his downward gaze.

    #13599

    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    This colour palette works really well, Ralph, The background’s almost monochrome grey/green; but the gold of the pasty stands out clearly against the complementary blue of the guy’s coat – a great example of a colour photograph where the colour is actually doing something!

    In addition, the direction of the man’s gaze acts as an implied leading line, emphasising the diagonal made by the long axis of the pasty, which is pretty much the diagonal of the left-hand rebated square, with the pasty bang in the middle of it. Pretty neat composition!

     

    #13600

    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

     

     

    #13631

    Pete Robinson
    Keymaster

    Two very different and striking portraits there Ian. The first is low key and has a sense of mystery for me with the darkness hiding some of the lady’s face. It has a very strong and direct eye contact. The eye on our right graduates into darkness and some would prefer it to be lit more, but does it add to the effect? Is this taken with ‘Rembrandt Lighting’ creating the triangle under the eye.

    The second portrait is high key and more conventional for me. Her pleasant smile is easier to understand than the expression in the first portrait. Her left eye is in the middle of the horizontal where we’re told to place it and it works here for me. Both of the ladies have a contrasting hair colour compared to the plain backgrounds to they are separated from them.

    Thanks for posting these Ian.

    #13634

    wbaxter
    Participant

    Two portraits of the same guy taken on Tuesday 31-1-2017

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 7 months ago by  wbaxter.
    #13635

    wbaxter
    Participant

     

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 7 months ago by  wbaxter.
    #13638

    Martin McGing
    Participant

    Taken last year at Whitby.  The lighting is a bit harsh, but a pleasing subject

    #13639

    Martin McGing
    Participant

    Another one from Whitby.  This lady is the owner of an art shop who entered into the spirit of the “Goths” weekend.  I would have liked to have spent more time perfecting her portrait but she had customers to attend to.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 7 months ago by  Martin McGing.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 7 months ago by  Martin McGing.
    #13641

    Martin McGing
    Participant

    Where else, Whitby.  I was actively encouraged to enter into the spirit of Whitby by wearing some sort of costume.  A 1930’s press photographer was the best suggestion, perhaps next time.

     

    #13642

    Martin McGing
    Participant

    After posting the original image, I thought it had potential so I cleaned it up in Photoshop and added a texture.  At the moment I like it.

     

    #13647

    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    Ralph, super! Club judges seem obsessed with the idea of the subject looking straight at the camera and, while I know why this is, it does limit things a lot! Ian has already pointed out why it works compositionally – we respond positively to good composition because the arrangement and balance of the picture elements are pleasing.

    Ian’s two shots show the difference lighting can make, while Wallace’s show what a difference even a slight change in expression can make. On this latter point I still find digital cameras a tad slow – you don’t always capture what you “saw”. This used to be a major argument against them in the early days when there was a lot of shutter lag and they were hopeless for some types of photography.

    Martin, your shop-owner is a stunner! How wise to tone down the background highlights, especially, of course, the one near her eye.

    #13648

    Martin McGing
    Participant

    You all know that I like portraiture, so you might see quite a few posts from me!

    Things don’t always turn out how you intended.  No matter how many times I tell myself “pay attention to the background” I forget.  In my opinion this image needs straightening, however to do so cuts his hands off!  Next time I’ll get it right or allow for cropping.

    #13653

    Pete Robinson
    Keymaster

    I think it’s interesting to see Wallace’s two similar portraits of the same guy. In the black and white version I prefer the smiling expression compared to the first, but think the partially hidden ear looks a little bit odd. Or am I being to fussy?

    I really like Martin’s second version of the art shop lady. He’s made some relatively minor changes but it has improved the photo a lot. All the attention is now on the lady’s face. The picture of the couple is natural and well posed and positioned for me, but it looks like the light was a bit dull which is a shame.

    In the last photo the guy looks very proud and dignified. They say hands are always a problem in portraiture but I think they’re fine in this one. To me the guy looks straight, but the house is leaning back! Would it take a head and shoulders crop?

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