JULY THEME: People

Forums Monthly Theme JULY THEME: People

This topic contains 89 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Peter Robinson Peter Robinson 3 years, 4 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 76 through 90 (of 90 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #7302
    Profile photo of Mervin Heywood
    Mervin Heywood
    Participant

    What’s this ‘HCB style’ you speak of? I’ve seen it noted a couple of times.

    #7303
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Merv >>> John’s talking about the underlying geometry of the composition, which is fashioned after one of the ways that Henri Cartier-Bresson (HCB) used to compose pictures:

    Here, I’ve used one of the main diagonals (top left to bottom right) and the line from one of the corners that cuts the diagonal at right angles (called a ‘reciprocal’) to align the various important elements of the picture in relation to each other and the frame.

    Cartier-Bresson was a trained painter. In particular, he studied in Paris with a cubist painter called André Lohte – not a great painter, but a very important teacher – who was very keen on compositional geometry. He made his students analyse the geometry of great paintings in the nearby museums and galleries, by tracing various standard patterns of lines on to photographs of them to see how they’d been constructed. The students had to do this a couple of times a week, and HCB was with him for two years. HCB got so familiar with this that he could ‘see’ the composition of  a photograph in the viewfinder instantly, without thinking about it. When the elements in the scene came together in an alignment of elegant compositional geometry that supported the meaning of the picture, he called that the ‘decisive moment’. He was an utter master at doing this – his compositions are miraculously precise. (Mine are a bit ‘approximate!)

    Hope this helps.

    #7304
    Profile photo of Mervin Heywood
    Mervin Heywood
    Participant

    Thank you Ian, very informative and then some 🙂

    #7305
    Profile photo of Peter Robinson
    Peter Robinson
    Keymaster

    And I was sitting next to John and took this picture around the time he and Ian took thier photos. I get the booby prize!

    I also took a couple of candids at the park for this ‘challenge’. I’ll never make a street photographer, but it’s a bit of fun.


    I read at short notice of a steam engineer being in the station on Sunday morning. I rushed up and grabbed this people shot:
    I might call it “Recalculating!” (as in savnat speak). sorry about the copyright

    Last minute I decided to visit the Audlem Transport meeting and there was a lot more goingon than I thought.
    I got a couple of people shots there:

    #7307
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Peter >>> I very much like the wide-angle shot of the Lagonda (and the man scrutinising it!)

    #7308
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    Well done Peter.

    I like the train drivers looking in opposite directions and one looking worn-out.

    The Audlem shots are great. You said before the event that the number of people about makes getting some shots difficult and getting closer in on details is the answer if you want to make your shot simple. I like the way you’ve got the guy framed by the car bonnet and the fact that there are two people on each side gives a balance. That’s very good.

    Just shows what we all know; there are an infinite number of possibilities and three photographers will come up with three quite different angles on the same subject (bowls). Thanks for posting those, very enjoyable.

    PS. Don’t apologise for the copyright.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 4 months ago by Profile photo of John Royle ajroyle.
    #7310
    Profile photo of KEN LAST
    Anonymous

    WOW—-So we are almost at the end of the subject “People” –nice set of pics–big entry–but we are not getting the WOW factor–don”t you agree. All pretty mundane stuff.Last year our Chairman said we should take a leaf out of Alsagers book,or words to that effect to get those WOW photo”s. Mine you will agree are as routine as the next and I have an excuse. Should that be the challenge with Ian”s August subject–to really nail the WOW factor–not easy but a worthy challenge.Think more constructive critique rather than platitudes would be a step in the right direction. Often it seems to me-its not just the picture-its what some photographers do to get a wow in most ordinary photo”s. It has always evaded me–but it has to be there for the taking.

    #7313
    Profile photo of Tom Seaton
    Tom Seaton
    Participant

    Took her at the Tatton Flower Show on Saturday – she was selling posh sheds!

    #7314
    Profile photo of Tom Seaton
    Tom Seaton
    Participant

     

    These two I call  ‘ The Oilmen’

    Also at the flower Show on Saturday. I have a few more but no time to post them.

    It’s taken me lots of attempts to post these two.

     

    #7315
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Two good contributions, Tom. I particularly like the Oilmen, because of the action you captured. (Are they arguing about what happens to North Sea oil after Scottish independence? 😉 )

    (Glad you were able to work out how to post pictures – you’ll be able to do it quicker next time, I’m sure, so let’s see ‘a few more’! Would it be possible to resize the new ones to ‘650px longest side’? We use that max size as they fit better for those who view the site with a tablet or phone.)

    Keep ’em coming, Tom!

    #7316
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    Thanks for those Tom. We didn’t go to Tatton this year. The lady is nicely framed and, because of the reflections on her glasses, is both looking at you and not, which is interesting. The two guys are deep in conversation, like the ones in my shot and the T shirts and yellow papers also link them. The bottles and partial sign set the scene.

    Uploading is a bit of a process, even when you are used to it. I put them in a Gallery first, one which is not “public” then you can  upload them again on to the Forum. Perhaps we could do another demo on the first night.

    #7317
    Profile photo of KEN LAST
    Anonymous

    NOW Sir Tom–almost at the end of this subject these both have a touch of the wow factor–IMPACT in both. The lady taken from a low point and three quarter angle-the specs and hat the “look” and cleverly cropped with her proportions tall and slim–spot on. The second is so full of real life–nothing false with the inter action of these two guys–anyone argue with the view this one of Toms has to be the very best of “People” subject.Very fruity and aromatic!! My opinion anyway.–Also the two guys–great photography this—heads and shoulders –pin sharp–fore and aft slightly OOF–very nice.

    #7319
    Profile photo of Tom Seaton
    Tom Seaton
    Participant

    Thanks for the kind comments. Both were taken with my Fujifilm X-E1.

    Mary suggests that I rephrase the comment about the haughty lady with the steely eyed look – not ‘took her, but ‘took her photo’.

    Her glasses in the original were completely black so I lightened them a bit and low and behold that look appeared.

    The Oilmen was a lucky one in that the chap on the left was quite animated and moving about a lot.

    It did occur to me after posting that I should restrict the size of the longest side, but it was late!

    #7320
    Profile photo of KEN LAST
    Anonymous

    MARY IS QUITE RIGHT TOM–at first fooled me—thought you had taken the lady to the flower show!! —well  I  thought -you wily old bird—a man after my own heart!!

    #7325
    Profile photo of Peter Robinson
    Peter Robinson
    Keymaster

    Thanks for your comments folks and good to see Tom submitting some fine photographs. They show the quality of the little fujis’. I particularly like the coulourful hat in the first shot which is mainly a low colour photo so the colourful framing her face works well for me. In your second shot Tom, I think it’s all about the timing which can make or break this type of picture. You’ve timed it well for me and I like the expressions.

    When I prepare photos for the forum I resize them with the long size as 640px and leave the rest to be reduced proportionately. Then when I insert them into a thread I edit the html removing the size so it goes in full size. It’s just getting used to a technique that suits you best.

Viewing 15 posts - 76 through 90 (of 90 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.