Lightroom

Forums All About Photography Lightroom

This topic contains 9 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of John Royle ajroyle 5 years ago.

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  • #1170
    Profile photo of wbaxter
    wbaxter
    Participant

    Does anyone use or has experience of using the latest edition of Lightroom. I have been talking to other photographers and they swear by Lightroom as being more flexible than Photoshop when processing Raw files. I personally use CS5 and cannot imagine anything more simple or intuitive. Some years ago I tried Lightroom 2 I think it was 2 but I did not seem seem to find it any easier or quicker than Photoshop. It may be that now the newer version which supposedly has the same Raw converter as CS6 has an advantage over CS5.

    Advice would be appreciated.

    Wallace

     

    Wallace

    #1171
    Profile photo of D. Williams
    D. Williams
    Participant

    I think that Ian (of this forum) is the man to speak to Wallace.  I am pretty sure he uses Lightroom and will be able to advise.

    Dolores

    • This reply was modified 5 years ago by Profile photo of D. Williams D. Williams.
    #1173
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    I’ve used Lightroom for a couple of years now.  I also have CS5, which I hardly use for basic processing any more.

    Lightroom is designed for photographers. It provides a complete workflow, starting with importing, cataloguing, tagging and organising image files in ways that you can tailor to how you work. It then provides a Library of  your images that you can arrange, label, rate, sort and view as you require for particular purposes.

    Most importantly for me, it has powerful tools for ‘developing’ RAW files that comprise a ‘digital darkroom’ with all the specific facilities that a photographer would recognise and need. The tools in this part of the program are arranged intuitively and naturally for a photographer, and give direct control over colour temperature, exposure, tonality, contrast, sharpness and more, by means of simple scales with sliders and other equally intuitive means of adjustment. There are facilities for applying every sort of correction and adjustment very simply to specific parts of the image (for example, by ‘painting’ them on), as well as making adjustments globally. It is the power and sophistication of this digital darkroom that has resulted in my not needing to use CS5 for image development at all.

    Lightroom also provides powerful facilities for ‘outputting’ images in various ways: printing them; creating slide shows;  creating web output; etc.

    Photoshop, on the other hand, is fundamentally a compositing program with extensive and powerful facilities for graphic artists, many of which a photographer rarely needs. I now only use it when I need its ‘Spot Healing Brush Tool’ to remove complex elements like telegraph poles and wires, which Lightroom’s simpler Clone / Heal brush is not so good for. I rarely if ever do any compositing;  but if you like to do things like replacing the sky in a landscape photograph, then you’ll still need CS5 – Lightroom does not use a Layering system, which is essentially for that sort of compositing.

    Adobe has just updated the Ver 4 software, so we’re now on Lightroom 4.2, which has a range of  ‘behind the scenes’ refinements that make it faster, smoother and more efficient.  It’s a joy to use.

    I’m very happy for you to come and have a look at what it can do, if you want a demo and a play.  Or you can download a 30 day free trial from Adobe here:

    https://www.adobe.com/cfusion/tdrc/index.cfm?product=photoshop_lightroom

     

    #1174
    Profile photo of wbaxter
    wbaxter
    Participant

    Thanks Ian I may take up your offer to come for a demo and a play. Then I will download a trial. Will speak to you next Thursday about possible dates .

     

    Wallace

    #1175
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    No problem, Wallace.  Let’s arrange it next Thursday.

    #1235
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    Lightroom is becoming very popular, especially since the introduction of Lightroom 4 and the halving of the price. Ian has said enough to interest anyone in trying it and some would say that L4.2 and Photoshop Elements 11 is all you need in your software armoury.

    I really enjoy using Lightroom but there is one big disadvantage for me; 4 doesn’t run on XP.

    #1237
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Haven’t Microsoft stopped supporting XP with security updates, etc?  If so, it’s probably not really wise to carry on using it.  Time to upgrade? Or get a Mac? 😉

     

    #1238
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    I would hope not, since Microsoft has to conform to US requirements of 7 years cover and I bought my machine about 5 years ago. In fact they continued to install XP on tablet machines after I bought my desktop as Vista was too memory hungry to be supported on 1Gb.

    • This reply was modified 5 years ago by Profile photo of John Royle ajroyle.
    #1242
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Here’s the Microsoft lifecycle support page.  See ‘End Of Support’ about half way down the page:

    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows/products/lifecyclea

     

    #1244
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    Yes, I did look it up after posting that comment. April 2014.

    I will probably update to L4.2 on my laptop. I like the speed of it – straight into adjustments and image making instead of changes in Camera Raw first – all one smooth process. The local changes you can make are very clever by being “edge aware” they make dodging, burning etc easy. It is rather like the Nik software in this regard.

    There are many sites now offering Lightroom tutorials but the clearest explanations I’ve found come from Laura Shoe http://laurashoe.com/ . Ian Whiston has a fairly comprehensive list of sites, we’ll put some of the best on the Links when he gets back.

    If you want to make montages (or composites) you have to use PS or PS Elements, though On One and Topaz software now offer programs which work in layers. I am trying these but would stop at saying you don’t need PhotoShop at the moment. PS is still my first choice if I am working through to printing as it has full control of  paper profiles etc – though I believe this is now available in L4 (getting left behind you see!)

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