MAY THEME – Working Colours

Forums Monthly Theme MAY THEME – Working Colours

This topic contains 68 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Peter Robinson Peter Robinson 5 months, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #14175
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

     

     

     

     

    The colour scheme for this one’s a bit different: it is called ‘Tetradic’. A tetradic colour scheme uses two pairs of complementary colours (here gold & blue and green & red) with colours that form a sort of ‘square’ on the colour wheel. So while one’s first thought might be to say that the picture seems visually ‘busy’, you can’t help feeling that it’s somehow coherent. And that’s what the colour palette is doing – holding all this together.

    #14176
    Profile photo of Peter Robinson
    Peter Robinson
    Keymaster

    It interesting to see and compare both versions. I think it works well in black and white, but do prefer the colour version. I can understand your comments and agree with them. I think the spot lights are more dominate and distracting in the black and white version, while in the colour version they blend in more.

    #14191
    Profile photo of KEN LAST
    KEN LAST
    Participant

     

    #14194
    Profile photo of Peter Robinson
    Peter Robinson
    Keymaster

    The blues have it in this photo with a spot of red in the mix. If one of the blue items was a different colour it would change the picture completely.

    #14198
    Profile photo of Peter Robinson
    Peter Robinson
    Keymaster

    I took a trip to Styal Woods on Thursday hoping to find some bluebells for this month’s theme. I found out how difficult it is to photograph flowers in general. trying to find a suitable supporting background is a nightmare. This field of buttercups made life a lot easier but I still managed to mess up the focusing!

    I also like a good shadow and the bright fresh green really contrasts strongly with the darker tones in the picture below.

    The picture below was one of the better one I took on the day, but the background is still a bit messy.

    Getting in closer and using a wider aperture softens the background but the light tone pulls the eye from the subject. The question is which follower to focus on? I’ve been advised to focus on the nearest in a situation like this, but chose to focus more centrally. What do you think?

    #14200
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    I am often photographing flowers and gardens and can testify that they are not easy subjects. In the recent LCPU Annual Nature prints there were very few pictures of flowers. You would think they make easy subjects because they dont run off and yet motion blur can be a big problem, making macro work impossible in some conditions.

     

    Backgrounds really are a trial and yet using a big aperture to keep it out of focus can make your depth of field a problem. On point of focus you can always tell immediately where it should have been if you get it wrong when you see the print! I find with flowers that, if the stamens and stigma are sharp, it is usually OK and then you also need to have that point in a good position within the picture.

     

    I like to shoot flowers as forms sometimes, and there are plenty of scope for more experimentation there. Sue Bishop has some interesting work using a Lens Baby.

    #14202
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

     

     

     

    #14204
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Just out of interest, and for a bit of a change, here’s a 16 minute video by about colour in films…

     

     

     

    #14205
    Profile photo of wbaxter
    wbaxter
    Participant

     

    #14206
    Profile photo of KEN LAST
    KEN LAST
    Participant

     

    #14207
    Profile photo of Peter Robinson
    Peter Robinson
    Keymaster

    It’s good to see so many photographs posted in this month’s theme. They’ve given me plenty to think about.  Ian’s photo of the child in the orange jacket clearly demonstrates the importance of the colour in the picture. The orange jacket and scarf are so strong that the background is just overwhelmed. Thanks for posing the video Ian. Well worth watching.

    I really like Wallace’s photograph. It’s totally different from Ians’. The main subject is in white and stands out well from the dark green background. Is white technically a colour? It’s an intriguing pose with one arm framing the face and the other  hold the red ball at the top of the frame.

    I think Ken’s windmill is good as well. Good muted colours and the textured snow adding interest.

    #14208
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

     

     

     

     

    #14209
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    For anyone interested in colour palettes and their effect on atmosphere, I notice that the cinematographer et al who do the colour design for The Durrells (ITV3, Sundays 8pm) are a bit of a whiz at this, if last night’s episode (Series 2 Episode 4) was anything to go by. (You may be able to catch it for another 29 days on ITV Hub?)

     

    #14211
    Profile photo of KEN LAST
    KEN LAST
    Participant

     

    #14212
    Profile photo of KEN LAST
    KEN LAST
    Participant

     

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