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  • #14946
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    The purpose of the Photo of the Week is primarily signal that the website has been up-dated, or indicating a change at least to the casual surfer.

    It is often easy to make the selection, since our last competition provides us with at least three and that pattern keeps us going throughout the season.

    After the season finishes it becomes gradually more difficult to select something. We are back now with a supply of new winners from our first competition.

    I added the comment about “improvement”  simply to make it a bit more interactive than usual.

     

    #14898
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    A few years ago a member of another club told me that they had a married couple who were members who had had many of their locomotive pictures published, yet they could never get anywhere with the same images in club comps. The reason was simple, the magazines valued the images for reasons that the non-enthusiast was quite unaware of and the pictures lacked excitement or interest for the non-specialist viewer.

    Peter B is up against the same problem with his aeroplane pictures but do you remembr what he said in his talk, he tries to take pictures which show how he feels.

    Your comments show that you understand this perfectly well. Personally, I dont think the detail shots are a way forward.

    Is there any mileage in shots taken in the paddock area (Peter R had some interesting ones a while back) ? or perhaps ones taken on the inside of a corner.

    Perhaps a still picture of something whose movement conveys so much is always going to be a bit challenge. There isnt that pivotal moment that you get in gymnastics, so quick it deceives the eye, whichthe camera can capture.

    I saw an exciting shot in the PAGB print exhibition a while back. The bike was a production racer, so no fairings concealing the “works”. The photographer had chosen his spot well, getting the bike just at the top of a small rise in the road, so it was well defined  in a telephoto shot. It was on a corner. Two other factors helped; it was in mono and, best of all, sparks from the footrest grounding were the finishing touch.

    Hope these ramblings help!

    #14868
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    Judging by my results over the last few years I would say most of my work is “not the normal type of entry”.  That goes for quite a few of us I would think.

    In actual fact the idea behind this image is not so unusual. What is an unusual feature is the bright background.Top marks for trying something new Wallace, you could start a trend!

     

    #14788
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    Well done Ken.

    Wallace, of course! We discussed your camera for long enough! Still looks a lot like you!

    #14784
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    Thanks Ken and Wallace.

    See front page for a video of the event. Some superb drone shots, it also features Wallace!!!

    #14758
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    Thanks Kath. Yes, as I have said elsewhere – garden flowers just do not fit into club photography. They cannot be entered as nature and in the “open” category they are often overlooked as easy subjects or dismissed ( paradoxically and incorrectly) as “nature”.

    #14757
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    Glad ypu made it into town , Ken. The first shot there is nearly identical to one of mine. The artists were very friendly and it is another success for the organisers.

    #14717
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    In contrast to Barnsdale, Arley Hall gardens are traditional and have a famous herbaceous border, a double one in fact.

    Arley double border

     

     

    #14716
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    The garden at Barnsdale, Leicestershire acted as a television studio for many years for Gardener’s World while Geoff Hamilton played host. Geoff pioneered, or certainly promoted an organic approach to gardening but also loved building things and the garden is now divided into 38 smaller ones which he used to demonstrate different styles. This doesn’t help with photography as the great sweeping features are crowded out with the dense planting – now a tiny bit unruly – but it provides endless horticultural interest. It is also a fitting tribute to a highly regarded television gardener.

    Barnsdale

    #14686
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    Can heartily recommend Abbeywood Gardens at Delamere. We were there today and things were at their best. See here.

    BTW, two pictures loaded no problem, and in Explorer

    #14662
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    That sounds very good. Not a big margin when you think that they have to charge VAT and offer some sort of guarantee. I have had a similar experience with Wex, but they don’t pay you cash, they put the balance on account.

    Also says something for the weight carried by that little red dot!

    #14659
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    Those are soldier beetles, Peter.

    You guys are doing well, I shall have to pull my socks up and post a few.

    #14637
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    A coincidence! Going there tomorrow. We have visited several times in the last 18 months. All seasons, all weathers.

    Note – the photo uploader is no longer giving the option of resizing. Failed in IE and also in Edge.

     

    #14631
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    Ha ha. Well the scarecrow has a hat a bit like mine!

    Good subject Ken and one which would be testing to print. I’ll post another soon.

    #14628
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

     

    The water droplets trick works because it adds texture. I am quite happy with the surface texture of the unadorned petals myself, but it needs the right lighting and a lens capable of rendering good detail to bring it out. Also, in macro a very steady camera and subject.

    But, for something completely different, how about no colour and a wide view? Here is one I put in last year whose subtleties I don’t remember being appreciated. Working with a fixed, moderately wide angle lens you quickly adapt to the view and field that such a lens gives and you create your shots around the capabilities. At Packwood I was attracted by this scarecrow and its stance. For a typical “club shot” I would have made a portrait with a long focus lens and eliminated any distractions. Instead, the wider view makes, I think, a much more interesting picture. I could include the gardener and soon spotted that if I waited for him to bend down then not only would he be more obviously a secondary subject but he would echo the shape of the conifer in the background.

     

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 740 total)