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  • #1931
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    The gallery is above the Library in the centre of Leigh in Lancashire. The Gallery is actually called the Turnpike Gallery, but it feels like “upstairs at the Library”. It is a great space for an exhibition.

    #1910
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    Hi Meg,

    These inter-club comps only have a limited number of entries and so we have to use ones that have already been entered (and judged if possible). We have to take account too of things like who the judge is and also provide a mix of subjects.

    I wish there were some way of getting the members involved a bit and tonight there will be a display of images which are our short list for the KO for you to look at and give an opinion on.

     

    #1769
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    Yes, of course.

    #1739
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    No, he didn’t. He seems to have had no interest in the process involved after pressing the shutter release.

    You are right that many specialised in printing mono to perfection and there were often detailed articles in Amateur Photographer about how a particular print had been done.

    Other “greats” were involved in the whole process of course; James Ravilious blamed inhaling chemical fumes in his tiny cottage darkroom for the lymphoma which killed him.

     

    #1713
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    Thanks for those comments – I wish we could get a few more people in on this. The preparation for 1st November is now done but it has already spilled over to 22nd November too, so let’s have some more comments after the meeting tomorrow night. I see the two evening as complimenting each other.

    #1712
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    The web presentation is well done – can we have all those features Ian?

    I guess the connections between the photographs and the paintings is fairly weak in a lot of cases but it still makes an interesting exhibition. The variety of work is wide too which is good. I would certainly like to see it and ponder on the difference between paintings – where the artist is in full control of the content and photographs, which often pluck ready-mades. When photographs are contructed – like Fenton’s still life there is still the stricture of reality because of the physical nature of the process of photography. The artistic aspects of photography are its own and it is a mistake to “copy” paintings as they once did. I think though that studying the work of painters can inform your photography in many ways and it is a good thing to do.

    #1683
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    Thanks for those folks, that’s very useful. We actually have another open evening at the end of November so we really have two sessions to cover these things.

    I might add that working in low light does present a few problems and not least is focusing (your auto will be slow to work and may latch on to the “wrong” thing), so you might be better focusing manually. Flash in low light will kill all the atmosphere. High ISO will give you a noisier picture but you may be able get rid of the noise quite effectively in post-processing. It is a matter of understanding the factors (shutter speed, aperture, ISO, focusing) and also knowing your gear – then you can make the choice as to what to do in the particular circumstances. Digital photography helps enormously in the learning process because all the information about each image is there for you to study afterwards and trial shots cost you nothing rather than the 30p or so for film.

    White balance – there is one relatively simple answer – shoot RAW, that way you can adjust things afterwards. I think being fussy about white balance is important if you really must achieve full colour fidelity – for example if you are shooting fashion, weddings etc or copying a painting. I have not done a white balance check since I bought a camera that shoots RAW. If you are shooting jpeg then you will be very limited as to how much you can adjust the colours afterwards and then checking white balance is important.

     

    #1635
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    Thanks for those, Folks.

    We have a talk about flash later in the season.

    Selection – funnily enough Ian Whiston and I were talking about including something on that. Really fine cut-outs against a bright sky is really asking for the moon but yes, we’ll do something on that.

    We’ll see what we can get an internet connection.

    Mounting prints – yes we do usually do that earlier on – this year we were not going to do it at all but it came up, so we did it.

    Macro – perhaps we could mention a few things on that.

    Anythings else?

     

    • This reply was modified 5 years, 2 months ago by Profile photo of John Royle ajroyle.
    #1484
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    Hopefully the problems have been solved by our web developer changing things a bit….

    Update 19/10/12: It seems that our web designer has now modified  the Forum. When you are writing a post and want to insert an image you switch to the HTML screen and tap the little button marked ‘img’ (it’s above the editor window) then fill in the form you get. You must have the image URL ready for this – Ian M

    If this solves the problem then perhaps we should delete this thread or simplify it as it is a bit long!

    #1392
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    You should see the light paintings Ian Tweeted today….

    http://jannepaint.wix.com/jannepaint#!page-5/photostackergallery1=1

     

     

    #1389
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    I don’t use HDR as such but some of the Topaz effects are HRD-like, as is the effect of using “Shadows and Highlights” adjustments in photoshop, or even, for that matter anything where you are brightening shadows and/or darkening the highlights.

    True HDR is achieved by combining several exposures of a scene so that the dark bits, medium bits and highlights all get the correct exposure and it gives a richer effect than simply working on a single image where the dark bits will be underexposed and therefore reveal noise when they are artificially brightened.

    Full blown HDR can look absolutely awful. The skill comes in combining the several images and a skillful job may not look  like HDR. I am thinking of a picture by Geoff Robinson of NCPS  of the Millenium Bridge in Newcastle – a night shot. Superb job, you would never say Oh, HDR, but it was 5 images combined.

    You can use a special program to help you combine the images and the longest established one is Photomatix. Nik have just released one too which has had good reviews.

    One photographer who is making a speciality of all this is Captain Kimo. He did a tutorial for Topaz which you might like to watch.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VkgKfF1Gpc8&list=UURe2W-32N-_uStDULAEdyKA&index=19&feature=plcp

    I thought I would just edit this and post Medic at various stages.

     

     

    • This reply was modified 5 years, 3 months ago by Profile photo of John Royle ajroyle.
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    #1383
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    The Medic picture you may be referring to just grew gradually into what you finally saw.

    It started with what I thought was a decent enough shot at Crich of the guy leaning on a jeep. The background was full of people although quite blurred and I first of all blurred the background a bit more. There were still distractions so I next darkened the background. It was looking OK but this was about the time I bought the complete TOPAZ suite of software and I decided to use the cut-out plug-in (Re-Mask) to isolate the man and jeep a bit more. It was not really necessary to use Topaz on this – when your cut out is going to be placed against a dark background a fairly rough and ready job is good enough. I used Topaz Adjust to add the grittyness to the image. By now the background was looking dark and getting featureless so I added a texture, actually the orangery wall at Calke Abbey. The texture is added as an additional layer and then masked out where the man and his jeep are. Finally I did a straight black and white conversion.

    Fishing Tackle was another image where I worked to produce something which went beyond a “straight shot”. Here I think the effect comes as much from the fact that it is printed on one of the textured papers – possibly Museum by Permajet – as anything. It is hard to recall exactly what I did to this image but I do remember two things which are useful tips:-

    1. As I worked on the image the red flag was looking too prominent so I desaturated it using the sponge tool.

    2. After its first outing Ian Whiston said he thought the clouds at the very top of the picture were too bright. I agreed, but I liked the clouds. I tried cloning them out but it was difficult. Then I had an idea – paint over them. I used a soft brush, picked a blue from the surrounding sky and painted over the clouds. Perfect! I had my nice shapes but no brightness to distract.

    When I say “paint over” I would always do this on a separate layer – never do anything to your original picture if you can avoid it. Working on a new layer gives you full freedom to erase, start again, adjust the brightness and colour or even scrap the idae altogether without having any effect on your image. This is the approach with cloning too – work on a separate layer. I’ll cover this in the stuff we do on November 1st.

    Sorry you’ve had to wait a bit for the answer, I didn’t spot the post until now.

    #1323
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    What service you get at CPS! I was just looking up Chris Nocturne’s website address and Ian’s answer appears!

    Chris gave us a very memorable talk http://www.noctography.co.uk/

    In the picture referred to above the author has made sure that the pole star is behind the light of the lighthouse so that the start trails appear rotate as you see.Tthe light on the lighthouse is well over exposed because it will have been on a few times during the long exposure. He may have needed a flash or two to light the foreground.

    Steven Pepper did some nice shots in the dark using a flashlight and coloured gels to “paint” the scene. One that he shot in the car park under the library won best image in the 2009(?) L&CPU Knock Out. Ask him about it.

    #1245
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    Yes, you can still only submit three images.

    #1244
    Profile photo of John Royle
    ajroyle
    Keymaster

    Yes, I did look it up after posting that comment. April 2014.

    I will probably update to L4.2 on my laptop. I like the speed of it – straight into adjustments and image making instead of changes in Camera Raw first – all one smooth process. The local changes you can make are very clever by being “edge aware” they make dodging, burning etc easy. It is rather like the Nik software in this regard.

    There are many sites now offering Lightroom tutorials but the clearest explanations I’ve found come from Laura Shoe http://laurashoe.com/ . Ian Whiston has a fairly comprehensive list of sites, we’ll put some of the best on the Links when he gets back.

    If you want to make montages (or composites) you have to use PS or PS Elements, though On One and Topaz software now offer programs which work in layers. I am trying these but would stop at saying you don’t need PhotoShop at the moment. PS is still my first choice if I am working through to printing as it has full control of  paper profiles etc – though I believe this is now available in L4 (getting left behind you see!)

Viewing 15 posts - 736 through 750 (of 765 total)