Forum Replies Created

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 1,366 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #14902
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Hi Wallace

    For my money, No 2 (the red bike) is the best. It has more drama than No 1 (a technically good, but rather literal, description of a bloke on a motor bike driving round a bend); it has better ‘context’ than No 3 (the one with the green bits), because No 3 removes all the informative stuff by being too tight, and thus finishes up as a picture of a tyre and disc brake; and it is clearer – less cluttered – than No 4, which doesn’t show the form of the rider’s knee very well, and has rather too much busy and distractingly irrelevant detail (which is coloured an even more distracting red!) on the ground at bottom left.

    So No 2 evokes the speed and danger of man and machine cornering hard, with inches separating the rider’s knee from the ground. And it does this by means of a dynamic composition – the wheel along the descending diagonal, at right-angles to a line through the rider’s right knee that’s parallel to the ascending diagonal, the tension between the two lines communicating the drama of the situation.

    (And goodness knows what a rider’s eye’s are supposed to add to a powerful photograph – unless they’re rolling heavenwards in disbelief at the judge’s inanity!)

     

    #14851
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Β “It’s the kind of photography I would love to achieve, but only rarely get anywhere near with a lucky shot.”

    I think Cartier-Bresson might have agreed with you, Peter. (And it’s why he hated showing people his contact sheets!) I console myself with the thought that it’s a matter of luck in the same way that luck made Luis SuΓ‘rez the highest goal scorer in the 2012-13 season with 24 goals out of 143 shots. If you know when to point your camera in the right direction, and press the button at the right time, sometimes you get lucky! πŸ˜‰

    #14805
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Ken >>> I find that if I’m going to write a long post, it’s safest to write it in a text editor on my computer, rather than directly into the forum editor. (I guess a Windows user would use Notepad, assuming that’s still the default text editor in Win 10.)

    Then, when you’ve typed, revised, spell-checked and saved your text, copy the lot to the clipboard. (Ctrl+A selects all of it; then Ctrl+C copies it.)

    Go to the forum post editor window, and select ‘Text’ at top right. Click in the window and use Ctrl+V to paste your message. (Click ‘Visual’ at top right to see how it’s going to look on screen, and do any tidying up you wish.) Press ‘Submit’.

    If you try to type and make alterations in the forum post editor directly, there are so many ways you can accidentally lose the lot. If you’ve written and saved it in Notepad, you can always get it back from there!

    Happy posting! πŸ™‚

    (PS – I thought Tom’s post was a very comprehensive description of the effect on cherished anachronisms of the vagaries of social and technological change. Thank goodness no one donated a really expensive ‘Valet’s Cup’ for the best wet-plate collodion print by a manservant! πŸ˜‰ Β )

     

    #14785
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Wow! The drone video is brilliant – and Wallace’s appearance in full photographer’s kit, including hat, is icing on the cake! 😉

    Thanks for posting the link, John.

     

    #14765
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Lovely work, Ken. I particularly like the detail picture of the artist’s materials and work in progress – a classic documentary shot.

    (And just a quick note regarding your concern about children. Although, under UK law, you may photograph anyone in a public place, the folk at Cheshire East don’t use pictures of identifiable children in material for general publication without written parental consent.)

     

    #14761
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Here’s the link to Wallace’s Flickr set:

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/140166215@N06/sets/72157685614798644

     

     

    #14669
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

     

     

     

     

     

    #14535
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    “Clubs are to blame for calling snap shots portraits.”

    Or Cartier-Bresson. πŸ˜‰

     

    #14454
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    It turns out that I, too, am unable to go to this event, so it would be good if someone could volunteer to take some photographs on the Saturday for the Community Development folk at Cheshire East Council.

     

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 2 weeks ago by Profile photo of Ian McNab Ian McNab.
    #14415
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Indeed – but it also gets tricky if, unlike the guys in the old “I’m sorry, I’ll read that again” sketch, you really are living in a shoe box!

    #14413
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    I’ve just been watching ‘The Art Of Japanese Life’ on BBC Four, in which the presenter, art historian Dr James Fox, gave an interesting short summary of what makes a work of art: technique; form; meaning; symbolism. And it struck me that photographers often concentrate on the first two at the expense of the second two.

     

    #14412
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Thanks, John. (But you were telling people about James Ravilious a long time ago!)

    #14388
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    “Have several video clips with sound which they can play back in another 70 years.”

    That’s assuming anything will be able to read the file format in 70 years, Ken – remember Betamax? πŸ˜‰

    #14378
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    I’m glad you liked the galleries of portraits, Peter. You’re right about the general absence of smiling from these portraits, and I understand that Claudia Imbert (a photographer in the ‘Fifth Portrait Festival in Vichy’ set) wanted her subjects “to suggest inner thoughts only they have access to”. (More pictures and information about this series in today’s Guardian.)

    As for the rest, I simply don’t know what direction the subjects were given about posing. But I always recall Bill Brandt’s surly instruction to his portrait subject: don’t smile – it makes you look stupid!

    Certainly, the instant adoption of a smiling pose when someone points a camera at us is a relatively recent cultural and social reflex. People rarely if ever smile in photographic portraits from the 19th century and early 20th century. This was perhaps at first due to the long exposure times required for studio portraits, which made holding a convincing smile nearly impossible; but it was really due to cultural and social norms: etiquette required that the mouth be carefully controlled, and beauty standards likewise called for a small mouth. In this regard, portrait photos were styled on traditional European paintings in which, generally speaking, only peasants, children and drunks smile!

    But by 1908, Kodak’s advertising of its new, easy to use cameras started to include smiling models; and Kodak’s advertising campaigns in the Twenties and Thirties continued to sell the idea of photography as fun by showing people smiling in photographs.Β  By the 1920s, advertising more generally used pictures for selling everything from beans to motor cars that showed beaming models having a great time. Thus the photographic smile was arguably a product of sophisticated American advertising in the early 20th century. And it was certainly only in the early 20th century that the habit spread – again encouraged by Kodak’s adverts – of encouraging people to say ‘Cheese’ when having their picture taken, to create the appearance of a smile.

    Now, if you look at Instagram, you see that the photographic smile is the immediate and routine reaction of people being photographed. I even see it surprisingly often when I do street photographs: quite a lot of people who notice me pointing a camera in their direction instantly smile; and young women may even do an exaggerated ‘S’ pose like a fasion model.

    So if you want to do portraits that don’t look casual and camp, you really do have to direct people quite firmly not to smile!

    #14368
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    It calls itself ‘Middlewich FAB’, and the FAB stands for ‘Folk & Boat Festival’. I know some of the people who have, in the past, organised the ‘Folk’ aspect of it – the bands on the main stage; concerts in pubs; open events where anyone can come up and perform; morris dancers in the main street and in the Bullring; etc. Since last year (I think) the organising of the music, the events and the rest of the festival were taken over by the town council. They did a good job, and the people of the town came out in large numbers to support it.

    The gathering of boats on the canal, and associated stalls, food, and craft activities will go on as always, though, as you say, all that is now less central to the weekend than it once was. (Still lots of colourful, eccentric and interesting people to photograph along the canals, though! πŸ˜‰ )

    People thronging the streets, or browsing at the crafts / clothes / jewelery / food stalls around the Market Field, where the ‘Main Stage’ performances happen, and the concert audiences standing and sitting informally around the stage on the grass, all offer lots of highly photographable people and situations.

    As you may guess, I’m an enthusiast; and I’ll be going (and hoping for the essential fine weather!). Watch out for pictures on my Flickr stream next week! πŸ˜‰

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 1,366 total)