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  • #996
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    This is beautifully lit. The lighting and exposure render the textures of her skin and hair really well; and the specular highlights on her eye lids and hair add to the effect. The soft lighting and the skillfully rendered textures are very sensuous, which is entirely in keeping with the youth and beauty of the model and the feeling and atmosphere of the image. (Perhaps if you were being pernickety you might have put a touch of light on the background to get a bit more separation?)

    The overall line of the composition lies along the Baroque diagonal (bottom left to top right) of an almost – but not quite – square frame, which gives a general direction of flow with which the upward tilt of her face contrasts to create a dynamic tension. And this subtle tension in the lines of the composition (which the not-quite-squareness of the frame enhances) seems to reflect and support the sense of inner emotional tension that the pose and expression convey.

    It is the emotional tone of the picture that seems to me problematic. The apparent emotional intensity is somewhat at odds with the obviously posed formality of the portrait, so that the viewer is left wondering whether the emotion is genuine or merely acted for the sake of… what?  And this doubt shifts the interpretation of the image away from taking it as a portrait, for it seems not to be inviting empathy with a fellow human being, or any effort for recognition of another person’s state of mind. Rather, it feels more like a constructed glamour image of some sort, which invites the viewer into a relationship that is ultimately essentially shallow.

    So it seems to me a technically skillful glamour image of a beautiful young woman, of the sort that might appear in a fashion magazine, which one can’t feel any strong reason to engage with more than superficially. But as an exercise in making that kind of image, it’s a very accomplished photograph.

    • This reply was modified 5 years, 1 month ago by Profile photo of Ian McNab Ian McNab.
    #970
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    There are excellent outlines of ‘The Basics’ here:

    http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/learn-photography-concepts.htm

    The guy who runs the site, Sean McHugh, is very knowledgeable and gives clear, well-illustrated explanations.

    The very first section, “Basics: How your camera works” covers pretty much everything a beginner might want to know about, and has clear explanations and diagrams. The particular topics you mention about the ‘exposure triangle’ (aperture, shutter speed, ISO) are covered in the section on “Understanding Camera Exposure: Aperture, ISO & Shutter Speed“.

    Do you think this material will cover what’s needed, Paul?

    #923
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Interesting article, Wallace.  A couple of things Eddy Sethna says seem to me  particularly important; and they also speak to the matters that Brian Law was concerned with. Talking about the main point of a photograph being its ‘meaning’, Eddy says,

    “Appreciation of all art, including a photograph, is not primarily an intellectual exercise but an emotional one, which may be pleasurable, depressing, moving or frightening. It is the feelings, emotions and mood that a picture conveys which is the core of the  ‘message’  and should form the basis of evaluation of a picture.

    “Good judging is done more by the heart than the head, with the ability to feel a picture and not just visualise it. It is the buzz and tingle which one experiences on seeing a good picture which is at the heart of judging.”

    This is ultimately to do with why a picture stops you in your tracks, makes you look twice, or makes you say, “Wow!” with either delight or shock. But Eddy also makes the point that such responses are harder to articulate than are matters of technical execution, which is why I guess many judges fight shy of addressing them. The objective questions about a picture – What does it depict? When was it made? How was it made? – are always so much easier to answer than the subjective ones – How does it affect you? What do you feel about it? Why does it matter? – and somehow so much less important, aren’t they?

    #919
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    I don’t do prints myself, so I’m not the best person to advise about this.  I’ve heard people say that Cotswold Mounts offer ready-cut mattes and backs at a good price (though there is a minimum order.)

    As for labelling and glueing, I guess there’ll be something in the Printing & Mounting section of ‘Resources’ on the (Results/Downloads tab)

    HTH

     

    #913
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    40cm x 50 cm, and less than 4mm thick.

    HTH. 🙂

     

     

     

    #901
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Yes, you can use the “attach image” method, and click on the thumbnail that appears under the post to open it.

    But if you want to embed the image in the post, with text above and/or below it, just type the code into the post, like this

    replacing the letters URL with the full link to your image.

     

    • This reply was modified 5 years, 1 month ago by Profile photo of Ian McNab Ian McNab.
    • This reply was modified 5 years, 1 month ago by Profile photo of Ian McNab Ian McNab.
    #897
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Try refreshing/reloading the browser page – should make everything re-appear as it should be.

    Regarding image sizes, I forgot that ImageShack has a set of fixed sizes.  640 x 480 is near enough, so don’t bother resizing the JPG in Photoshop or whatever.  I think Flickr uses 640, too, with 500 being the next size down.  So I’m sure we can live with 640 longest side.

    (Nice image, by the way! The soft natural light works really well, especially in the second one, where the skin tone is a bit paler.)

    #893
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Hi, D

    I just edited your post, above, to make it work.

    Click the grey ‘Edit’ at the top right of the frame, and when the editor opens, press the HTML tab (again top right) to have a look at what you need to type.

    Hope this helps.

    I know it’s not the same as the url[\IMG] tags that the other forum uses.  This forum just uses different software, so different tags, that’s all. Should be just as easy when you get used to how to write the tag.

     

    #890
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    You just have to type this code into your post where you want the image to be inserted, with the full URL (e.g. the imageshack link to your picture file) replacing the letters URL:

    You’ve just attached your picture to your post, which doesn’t display it IN the post as you want.

    Instead, type the code above into your post (the space in ‘img src’ and the punctuation are important), and it will display like this  (Perhaps the image could do with being a bit smaller – you could use 600px longest side)…

     

     

    #876
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Lightroom 4 is now just under £104 from Adobe. (£59 if you qualify for education discount!)

     

    #873
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Hi, Paul

    This forum software uses HTML tags, not ‘Bulletin Board’ url[\IMG] style tags.  There are details in the first post in the Welcome forum, here http://www.crewephotosoc.com/fora/topic/welcome/#post-678

    Use the “img src=” tag as described in the middle of that post, including the angled brackets < > and the URL in double quotes.

    #844
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Were you lurking on the bank with a 600mm lens again?

    (Which French celeb mag have you taken it to?)

    😉

    #800
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Thanks, Ken. I’ve been doing a bit more reading, and it seems that the autofocus works better when using the electronic viewfinder, rather than the optical viewfinder.

    The X100 isn’t a DSLR, and you wouldn’t use it for sports photography, or expect it to keep up with fast-moving dogs or children. But the AF is apparently no slower than a Leica X1, or the Panasonic GF2 or GH2.

    I have to say, if I could afford to buy two, I’d be buying an X-Pro-1 instead! Sorry!!

    #794
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Thanks, Ken. I’ve read lots of reviews and comment, favourable and otherwise. It sounds a bit like one of those cameras you either love or hate! That’s why I wanted to see if anyone in Crewe PS had used one, and what they thought.

    I don’t mind the fixed local length – used a Pentax Spotmatic II with the wonderful SMC Takumar 50mm f/1.4 for years (and still do occasionally!).  And for every-day use I carry a Nikon D40 with a 35mm prime on it (as you know, that’s equivalent to a 50mm on a  full-frame body in terms of angle of view).

    But a 35mm full-frame equivalent lens – like the one on the X100 –  is perfect for general & street work. (Just walk to zoom!) And one of the attractions of the X100 is its sparklingly sharp image quality – the Fujinon lens is excellent.

    So I’d still love to hear from someone who knows from using it how the X100 handles.

    (Sasha does, indeed, look great regardless of camera!)

    #788
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Phew! Glad it worked!!!

    (Thanks for your retweets on Twitter – great to spread the word about @crewephotosoc!)

Viewing 15 posts - 1,351 through 1,365 (of 1,366 total)