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  • #1128
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Yes, I see what you mean about the dark spot below the reflected chimney. I think it’s actually one of those peculiar effects you get in water reflections where a barely-discernible ripple causes a reflection  – here of a dark bit of chimney – that’s separated from the main body of the object. But since it’s puzzling enough to be  too attention-getting,  I think you’re right about cloning it out.

    Not sure I entirely approve of interfering with the scene to make ripples! 😉  What attracted me was the uncanny stillness of the mill pond, which evoked the atmosphere on this very still afternoon beautifully.

    I should add that I had to do a bit of work on developing the out-of-camera RAW file to retrieve what detail you see here in the clouds and the reflected sky.  (I also warmed up the colour a bit, from a rather drab and washed-out original.)

    Thanks for your helpful (and flattering!) comments and suggestions.

    #1117
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Yes, I get the idea.  There are all manner of light modifiers.  In effect, yours sounds as though it works rather like a softbox – soft, diffuse light (as long as it’s fairly near the subject) and somewhat directional.  I guess it may or may not be silvered inside.  The effect on Brian is like a softbox – or a north-facing window, or one with a gauze or muslin or net curtain across it.  Same idea – diffuse the light so the light looks big from the subject’s point of view – the shadows then don’t have hard edges.

    #1113
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Is this the sort of diffuser you used?…

     

     

    Here, in contrast, is a softbox (not on the same scale! It’s 60cm x 60cm)…

    • This reply was modified 5 years, 3 months ago by Profile photo of Ian McNab Ian McNab.
    • This reply was modified 5 years, 3 months ago by Profile photo of Ian McNab Ian McNab.
    #1112
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    When you say, “As for other clubs I have been on many sites and see scrolling images”, which ones do you have in mind?

    #1109
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Two things to say about this.  First, I’m not sure how you go about embedding a slide show in a WordPress page, but I guess it would almost certainly need a plug-in, which would have to be compatible with our main WordPress installation and theme plug-in.  And it would probably be nasty, clunky Flash (and so wouldn’t run on iOS devices.)  Anyway, I foresee complications, and more trouble than it’s worth! 😉

    But, secondly, it is called ‘Image of the week’, and while me and you and a couple of others might spend a lot of time here, the less-frequent visitor probably doesn’t feel they look at the picture all week.  And shouldn’t we allow the authors of these photos, which have often had prestigious success in competition, to enjoy their moment of glory by being on display for a week?  Certainly, this is a common practice on other club sites – it’s not just about showing a lot of good images, but also celebrating the success of a club member.

    (I understand that there is a plan to have a more developed ‘Club Gallery’, the first trial run of which you can see on the ‘Galleries’ menu, as CPS Club Gallery.  Maybe that will eventually supply what you had in mind?)

    #1108
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Interesting that it’s lit with a softbox. When I wrote the comments above, I found myself about to say that perhaps the light might have been a little bit higher, and then thought that might have been tricky if the source was a window! (And I couldn’t zoom in on the catch lights to work out what the source might have been.)

    Anyway, you did a good job with the lighting. I like the chiaroscuro; I don’t know that you need fill light, unless you want to hint – but only very subtly – at a bit of form around his left ear. As it is, I just see the lighting as naturally contrasty.  But then I don’t know the ‘rules’ that judges go in for about portraiture! 😉

    #1102
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    I like this portrait, Meg. It shows ‘Brian’ as you might really see him if you happened to be in the same room, rather than as someone posing for their portrait. You immediately start to wonder what he’s thinking about, how he’s feeling, etc.  In other words, you start to relate to him as a person, and not as the subject of a photo.

    The side lighting is very nice, and I like the way it falls off across the background, but still gives some searation. I assume this was in natural light, near a window?  It certainly looks ‘Rembrandt-ish’, with gentle chiaroscuro modelling the forms very pleasingly.  (You can say that sort of thing to an Art graduate, can’t you?!)

    Of course, it’s not the sort of composition that would wow a club photography judge. They’d probably say it was too central in the frame, and perhaps that it should fill the frame more.  But I think, as a quality fine-art portrait, it’s fine, though I might have put his right eye where the diagonals actually cross – rather than just on one diagonal – or perhaps just above that point vertically?  And, if this is where he lives / works, I might have hinted at a bit more detail in the room, to include some sense of place.  (But that starts to turn it into a different image, and we should stick to what you actually did!)

    On my screen its just a tiny fraction on the dark side – but I wouldn’t brighten it much, as you’d spoil the introspective feeling and quiet atmosphere.

    As I’m looking at this, it’s growing on me.  I start to have lots of feelings and impressions about what Brian is like. And isn’t that what a real portrait should get you to do?  Excellent!

     

     

    #1099
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    You can use various places to store your image – upload it to your gallery on this site, or put it on a media-storing web site like Image Shack or Flickr.

    To get the URL for a photo in your gallery:
    1) Open your gallery from the menu bar (Galleries > Members’ Galleries > click on your own name > click ‘Gallery’)
    2) At the bottom of the box for your gallery, click [Edit]
    3) Click the ‘Edit Media’ tab
    4) double click the photo you want – it opens full size
    5) right-click on it, and select ‘Copy Image URL’ from the context menu. (Your computer may have a slightly different wording for this.)

    To get the image from Image Shack:
    Use only the URL in ‘Direct Link‘ or in the ‘HTML code‘ options – the others won’t work here.

    To get the image from Flickr:
    1) Open the image in Flickr and click ‘Share’ (just above the photo)
    2) Copy the HTML code for Medium 640, paste the lot into your post here, but remove everything except the URL from there. Then put it in quotes in the ‘img src’ tag in the usual way.

    Hope this helps.

    UPDATE 21Nov

    There’s now a much simpler way to put the URL into your posts. Just switch to the HTML screen (by clicking its tab above the Editor window). Then click the button marked ‘img’ and put the URL into the form you get. Switch back to Visual to see your image in the post.

    • This reply was modified 5 years, 3 months ago by Profile photo of Ian McNab Ian McNab.
    #1090
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Can’t help you with the rules for prints Meg – not my strong point. But to send a private message you have to use the person’s user name. So to send me a message you’d use icmcnab.

    You can see the user name if you go to Galleries > Members’ Galleries, and click on the person’s name. On their profile page, you see the user name below the person’s real name. It’s prefaced with an @ sign, but you leave that out when you’re entering it in the ‘Send To’ field of the direct message composer.

    Hope that helps!

    #1088
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Here you go, Meg…

    #1080
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Tom >>> Thanks very much for your thoughts on the photo. Glad you liked it. I think you’re completely right about photo titles: if they don’t make sense, ignore them and concentrate on the work – that’s what really matters, after all!

    #1077
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Thanks for your thoughtful reply, D. I do agree with you that a bit more physical separation of the young woman would have helped; but in photography you only get what you get. At least there’s figure-ground contrast between her pale coat and the dark clothes of the man behind, and between her black stockings and the sunlight road.

    And about the title – well, you may be right that it gives a hefty nudge to the viewer. But I was also taken with the mildly surreal contrast between the singularity of the title and the multiplicity of people in the photo. I hope you don’t too much mind my having my cake and eating it!  😉

    #1072
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Thanks, Meg. Yes, it’s Chester (photographed along Eastgate from the clock tower). I was experimenting with using composition (Golden Section rather than thirds, but a similar idea) and tonality to focus attention on a particular element; and alternating dark and light areas, like landscape painters do, to enhance the sense of depth.

    I got intrigued by how the formal means for emphasising particular parts of the image (composition & tonal contrast) also impart a sense of meaning and significance to elements that would otherwise be unremarkable – the woman and her white bag. It was also interesting to have a go at doing in a photo what Breugel and Lowry do with large groups of figures in paintings – helped here by the fact that the directions of movement are aligned with the street.

    #1065
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    I don’t think there’s any expectation that everyone will go in for these awards and exhibitions and distinctions.  Some people like that sort of thing and some don’t.  Myself, I can’t think of anything much worse!  But I can see why other folk enjoy it;  as Tony said, once you start it gets addictive.

    • This reply was modified 5 years, 3 months ago by Profile photo of Ian McNab Ian McNab.
    #1058
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    DPAGB = Distinction, Photographic Alliance of Great Britain (see http://www.pagb-photography-uk.co.uk/merit.htm )

    BPE3* = a British Photographic Exhibitions award (see http://www.b-p-e.org.uk/index.php/awards )

     

Viewing 15 posts - 1,351 through 1,365 (of 1,385 total)