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  • #1206
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Ken >>> Would if I could, but sadly not allowed!  But perhaps the chairman will read your post here and count you among the ‘Ayes’!

     

    #1198
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    I think that Costco have a cheap-ish service for development and scanning, too.

    #1193
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Meg >>> Would you remind me again who the Dane Bank tutor is that runs the lighting course?

     

    #1175
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    No problem, Wallace.  Let’s arrange it next Thursday.

    #1173
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    I’ve used Lightroom for a couple of years now.  I also have CS5, which I hardly use for basic processing any more.

    Lightroom is designed for photographers. It provides a complete workflow, starting with importing, cataloguing, tagging and organising image files in ways that you can tailor to how you work. It then provides a Library of  your images that you can arrange, label, rate, sort and view as you require for particular purposes.

    Most importantly for me, it has powerful tools for ‘developing’ RAW files that comprise a ‘digital darkroom’ with all the specific facilities that a photographer would recognise and need. The tools in this part of the program are arranged intuitively and naturally for a photographer, and give direct control over colour temperature, exposure, tonality, contrast, sharpness and more, by means of simple scales with sliders and other equally intuitive means of adjustment. There are facilities for applying every sort of correction and adjustment very simply to specific parts of the image (for example, by ‘painting’ them on), as well as making adjustments globally. It is the power and sophistication of this digital darkroom that has resulted in my not needing to use CS5 for image development at all.

    Lightroom also provides powerful facilities for ‘outputting’ images in various ways: printing them; creating slide shows;  creating web output; etc.

    Photoshop, on the other hand, is fundamentally a compositing program with extensive and powerful facilities for graphic artists, many of which a photographer rarely needs. I now only use it when I need its ‘Spot Healing Brush Tool’ to remove complex elements like telegraph poles and wires, which Lightroom’s simpler Clone / Heal brush is not so good for. I rarely if ever do any compositing;  but if you like to do things like replacing the sky in a landscape photograph, then you’ll still need CS5 – Lightroom does not use a Layering system, which is essentially for that sort of compositing.

    Adobe has just updated the Ver 4 software, so we’re now on Lightroom 4.2, which has a range of  ‘behind the scenes’ refinements that make it faster, smoother and more efficient.  It’s a joy to use.

    I’m very happy for you to come and have a look at what it can do, if you want a demo and a play.  Or you can download a 30 day free trial from Adobe here:

    https://www.adobe.com/cfusion/tdrc/index.cfm?product=photoshop_lightroom

     

    #1164
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    I don’t do competition prints, but I did mount prints (up to 18″ x 12″) on A1 mount board for college, using 3M SprayMount, which is re-positionable, as Meg says, rather than PhotoMount, which isn’t.  And I used it all the time for mounting prints in work portfolios.  It’s great if you need to adjust things, and it mounts stuff flat and without ripples or surface marks.  (Graphic artists and designers use it routinely for doing layouts.)

    I’ve no idea what experienced club members think of it for mounting images, though!  (I bet they use bits of masking tape, as Meg does.)

    #1142
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Ah, yes! I can do that! The cross is behind the white ‘tower’. Great stuff, Ken!

    #1141
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Ken >>> Thanks for your kind words. If you want to make ripples now, you’ll need to do it in Photoshop, I fear! 😉

    Med >>> Thank you. And thanks for confirming the view that the mark will have to go! (Perhaps we should have a day out to Top Withens to see if we can better Bill Brandt and Fay Godwin?!)

    #1128
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Yes, I see what you mean about the dark spot below the reflected chimney. I think it’s actually one of those peculiar effects you get in water reflections where a barely-discernible ripple causes a reflection  – here of a dark bit of chimney – that’s separated from the main body of the object. But since it’s puzzling enough to be  too attention-getting,  I think you’re right about cloning it out.

    Not sure I entirely approve of interfering with the scene to make ripples! 😉  What attracted me was the uncanny stillness of the mill pond, which evoked the atmosphere on this very still afternoon beautifully.

    I should add that I had to do a bit of work on developing the out-of-camera RAW file to retrieve what detail you see here in the clouds and the reflected sky.  (I also warmed up the colour a bit, from a rather drab and washed-out original.)

    Thanks for your helpful (and flattering!) comments and suggestions.

    #1117
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Yes, I get the idea.  There are all manner of light modifiers.  In effect, yours sounds as though it works rather like a softbox – soft, diffuse light (as long as it’s fairly near the subject) and somewhat directional.  I guess it may or may not be silvered inside.  The effect on Brian is like a softbox – or a north-facing window, or one with a gauze or muslin or net curtain across it.  Same idea – diffuse the light so the light looks big from the subject’s point of view – the shadows then don’t have hard edges.

    #1113
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Is this the sort of diffuser you used?…

     

     

    Here, in contrast, is a softbox (not on the same scale! It’s 60cm x 60cm)…

    • This reply was modified 5 years, 6 months ago by Profile photo of Ian McNab Ian McNab.
    • This reply was modified 5 years, 6 months ago by Profile photo of Ian McNab Ian McNab.
    #1112
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    When you say, “As for other clubs I have been on many sites and see scrolling images”, which ones do you have in mind?

    #1109
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Two things to say about this.  First, I’m not sure how you go about embedding a slide show in a WordPress page, but I guess it would almost certainly need a plug-in, which would have to be compatible with our main WordPress installation and theme plug-in.  And it would probably be nasty, clunky Flash (and so wouldn’t run on iOS devices.)  Anyway, I foresee complications, and more trouble than it’s worth! 😉

    But, secondly, it is called ‘Image of the week’, and while me and you and a couple of others might spend a lot of time here, the less-frequent visitor probably doesn’t feel they look at the picture all week.  And shouldn’t we allow the authors of these photos, which have often had prestigious success in competition, to enjoy their moment of glory by being on display for a week?  Certainly, this is a common practice on other club sites – it’s not just about showing a lot of good images, but also celebrating the success of a club member.

    (I understand that there is a plan to have a more developed ‘Club Gallery’, the first trial run of which you can see on the ‘Galleries’ menu, as CPS Club Gallery.  Maybe that will eventually supply what you had in mind?)

    #1108
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    Interesting that it’s lit with a softbox. When I wrote the comments above, I found myself about to say that perhaps the light might have been a little bit higher, and then thought that might have been tricky if the source was a window! (And I couldn’t zoom in on the catch lights to work out what the source might have been.)

    Anyway, you did a good job with the lighting. I like the chiaroscuro; I don’t know that you need fill light, unless you want to hint – but only very subtly – at a bit of form around his left ear. As it is, I just see the lighting as naturally contrasty.  But then I don’t know the ‘rules’ that judges go in for about portraiture! 😉

    #1102
    Profile photo of Ian McNab
    Ian McNab
    Keymaster

    I like this portrait, Meg. It shows ‘Brian’ as you might really see him if you happened to be in the same room, rather than as someone posing for their portrait. You immediately start to wonder what he’s thinking about, how he’s feeling, etc.  In other words, you start to relate to him as a person, and not as the subject of a photo.

    The side lighting is very nice, and I like the way it falls off across the background, but still gives some searation. I assume this was in natural light, near a window?  It certainly looks ‘Rembrandt-ish’, with gentle chiaroscuro modelling the forms very pleasingly.  (You can say that sort of thing to an Art graduate, can’t you?!)

    Of course, it’s not the sort of composition that would wow a club photography judge. They’d probably say it was too central in the frame, and perhaps that it should fill the frame more.  But I think, as a quality fine-art portrait, it’s fine, though I might have put his right eye where the diagonals actually cross – rather than just on one diagonal – or perhaps just above that point vertically?  And, if this is where he lives / works, I might have hinted at a bit more detail in the room, to include some sense of place.  (But that starts to turn it into a different image, and we should stick to what you actually did!)

    On my screen its just a tiny fraction on the dark side – but I wouldn’t brighten it much, as you’d spoil the introspective feeling and quiet atmosphere.

    As I’m looking at this, it’s growing on me.  I start to have lots of feelings and impressions about what Brian is like. And isn’t that what a real portrait should get you to do?  Excellent!

     

     

Viewing 15 posts - 1,351 through 1,365 (of 1,393 total)