January Theme – Food Photography

Forums Monthly Theme January Theme – Food Photography

This topic contains 17 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  KEN LAST 1 month, 3 weeks ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)
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  • #17905

    Pete Robinson
    Keymaster

    The theme for December is now closed

    The theme for January is

    Food Photography

    Over the festive season most of us will have enjoyed plenty of tasty food and I’m sure there’s plenty more in store. With daylight being in short supply and the weather not at it’s best it’s a natural step from the previous theme of still life to food photography. The great thing about photographing your food is that you don’t have to go far to find it and you can eat it afterwards! Your mission, should you accept it, is to make the food look inviting to eat.

    I’ve done some research on the subject and have found some of the tricks the professionals use to make the food more desirable, but I wouldn’t like to eat it afterwards. View this You Tube video to see why:

    Tricks to make food look delicious

    The Digital Photo School has this advice about food photography

    The Two Loves Studio gives 99 tips for photographing food.

    Thank you everyone who contributed to last months theme.

    To upload your pictures login and open the Forum post. Please do not use the attachments button. Ensure the ‘Visual’ tab is selected and not the ‘Text’ tab. Then click on the right hand icon in the edit menu that looks like a picture of a mountain. It’s best to resize your picture before hand to have a long side of something like 680px at 72ppi, but the upload dialogue box has a resize option.

    The ‘Upload Picture’ icon will load a dialogue box. Click on the magnifying box icon to navigate to your picture on your device. Wait until the source text is displayed, then if you want to resize it enter the long side number of pixels in the first field of the dimensions field. Then click OK. It’s not as complicated as it sounds!

    There’s no restriction on when the photograph was taken so search though your archives show us what you can produce. If you would like to suggest any topics for the monthly theme please let me know. Thank you to everyone who contributed to last months’ theme.

    • This topic was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by  Pete Robinson.
    #17959

    Pete Robinson
    Keymaster

    I’ll kick off this month’s theme with these four photos taken at various food festivals. They are more concerned with peoples involvement with the food rather than the food itself. The first one shows the lady offering me a tasty dish which, I think makes the viewer a part of the scene. Not only does she have eye contact, but she’s handing the food as well.

    I think the photo below is all about the symmetry of the composition. It’s centrally balanced and would probably been better if I cropped it to a square. What do you think? It’s a shame about the  guy in the background who’s a bit of a distraction. Can you smell the sizzling sausage?

    The photo below just shows a police lady about to enjoy a pastry. It’s just a simple photo showing how we enjoy our food. Photographing people eating can make them look awkward. Has anyone got any tips?

    In the photo below the food is mostly hidden so perhaps this isn’t a good example of food photography, but I just liked the unusual angle!

    #17961

    KEN LAST
    Participant

    Long lens Peter, lots of people feel awkward having their mugshot most of the time. Your links took me back to 1974 Peter. As District Catering Manager for University Hospitals of South Manchester -I implemented an innovative system of serving patients at The Christies Hospital.. This I imported from Switzerland –The Finnessa Tray meal Service System. At that time the Times were producing their first Sunday Times Colour Supplement. My innovative system had got public attention and the Times came down to run an article in the new colour supplement. I well recall watching very closely at their team going about the photography. In particular the care and preparation photographing a plated meal. Coating of oil to gloss the peas etc.Saw the results the next Sunday and all the care paid off with superb colour photo”s.

    #17962

    KEN LAST
    Participant

    #17975

    KEN LAST
    Participant

    #17976

    Pete Robinson
    Keymaster

    Thanks for posting these Ken. People do enjoy their food and your photos clearly show that. Your third photo is different in that it concentrates on the food itself in an artist style. I like the pattern of the sliced onion? rings. It makes for an interesting picture and the food looks inviting.

    #17981

    KEN LAST
    Participant

    Thank you Peter,I was slicing the onions to fry–and thought-get camera.

    #18032

    RALPH BROWES
    Participant

    For a technophobe this is still presenting problems – but hopefully some contrasting food images will follow!

    #18036

    RALPH BROWES
    Participant

    Maybe if I do it enough, I will get the hang of it!

    #18040

    Pete Robinson
    Keymaster

    Thanks for posting these Ralph. It’s fascinating to see how other cultures prepare and sell street food. It would never be allowed here with our strict health and safety laws. You would think the food is liable to get contaminated by flies and would cause food poison.

    #18041

    KEN LAST
    Participant

    It does Peter and worse. I will never dine out here unless food at risk has been cooked as I wait.Cheese omelette every time.

    #18043

    RALPH BROWES
    Participant

    Some of them climb Everest every year!The lad with the sandwich could be up there right now.
    Sorry about the quality of the images though – still all grab shots – and with a film camera.

    #18044

    KEN LAST
    Participant

    On the contrary Ralph–great photo,s very informative.I often think it would be good to see real life when members visit distant countries. This is a great set and thank you for posting.

    #18045

    Pete Robinson
    Keymaster

    Just something a bit different. I’m not sure if is really how or what they eat in the seventeenth century. If it it is some of them eat very well. I don’t think I’ve timed this very well with the guy with his mouth wide open. What do you think?

    Simple basic food not particularly photographed at it’s best, but it gives you an idea of what they eat.

    #18046

    KEN LAST
    Participant

    They are really splendid Peter–just as I remember. Very authentic–we had not got the lemons shipped over.Well done.

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