June Theme – Intentional Camera Movement

Forums Monthly Theme June Theme – Intentional Camera Movement

This topic contains 15 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  P Robinson(Test Account) 2 months ago.

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  • #16400

    Peter Robinson
    Keymaster

    The theme for May is now closed

    The theme for June is

    Intentional Camera Movement (ICM)

    Some of our members in the past have entered  photographs in competition where they’ve intentionally moved the camera during the exposure. This technique will need a longish shutter speed and while moving the camera making the exposure. You might need to use a neutral density filter so slow down the shutter speed. The chose of subject is all important. I think it works best if the subject is contrasty and has  a defined pattern. You can experiment by moving the camera in different ways, horizontally, vertically, zig-zag or rotate it and try different shutter speeds. This can create some some quite unpredictable and creative results.

    For more information have a look at this article on the Digital Photography School’s website:   Intentional Camera Movement (ICM)

    For some inspiration view the work of photographer Doug Chinnery Doug Chinnery’s website

     Thanks for your contributions.

    It’s easy to upload your pictures now. The best way to insert an image is to use the right hand icon in the edit menu. It looks like a picture of a mountain. If you wish you can prepare your picture before hand to have a long side of something like 650px at 72ppi, but the upload dialogue box has a resize option.

    There’s no restriction on when the photograph was taken so search though your archives show us what you can produce. If you would like to suggest any topics for the monthly theme please let me know. Thank you to everyone who contributed to last months’ theme.

    #16433

    wbaxter
    Participant

    This is one I took in Scotland last year. usually the tree abstracts are a dark background, this one had a blue sky and not too many trees

    #16440

    Peter Robinson
    Keymaster

    Wow! It wouldn’t look out of place in a modern art gallery. It looks more like a painting than a photograph. I find it quite striking and dramatic. Did you do much post procession to it? I think you must have kept the camera vertical otherwise the light sky would have merged with the trees and the effect wouldn’t have been as strong. Thanks for posting  this Wallace.

    #16490

    wbaxter
    Participant

    This one is as taken with no processing.

    #16516

    wbaxter
    Participant

    Another type of  ICM is panning below a couple of examples.

    #16517

    wbaxter
    Participant

    #16518

    Peter Robinson
    Keymaster

    Thanks for posting these Wallace. To be honest I hadn’t thought of panning when I considered ICM but of course it is. It’s probably the main use of ICM. I like the first shot best. This is my type of panned photo where the subject is sharp where you want to see it sharp while the blurred background and wheels give a great impression of speed. You’ve the right shutter speed and shown a great panning technique. However, I’m sorry but I’m not so keen on the second image. I think a panned photo like this needs a sharp reference point somewhere in it to relate the the blur. That’s just my opinion of course and I appreciate others might disagree with me.

    #16525

    wbaxter
    Participant

    Not quite ICM but the subject Moved

    #16526

    wbaxter
    Participant

    #16549

    Peter Robinson
    Keymaster

    No, not really ICM, but an useful technique to master for the right subject. I like the results which turns a normal picture into one which demands more attention.   It records the detail not seem in normal viewing. Will you tell us how you did it?

    #16551

    Peter Robinson
    Keymaster

    The picture below was created when I zoomed during the exposure.

    This was done by rotating the camera. I think I used a shutter speed of around 1/30 and twisted the camera at different speeds. Not everyone’s cup of tea, but certainly eye catching.

    #16552

    Paul Hill
    Participant

    I thought I’d best post a photo where I’ve used ICM. As most members will know I’ve now entered a couple of images using ICM but neither has scored that well. Lets be honest they are ‘Marmite’ shots and are an aquired taste. I do enjoy trying out this technique but it can be very difficult to get a decent image. Anyway here’s one from Delamere Forest that is a different view from the one that I entered last season.

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    #16554

    Peter Robinson
    Keymaster

    Thanks for posting this Paul. I agree that these are marmite photos and not to everyone’s taste. I don’t like marmite, but do like some of the creative images ICM can produce. I think your photo is of a similar subject to Wallace’s version, but they are so different. I would guess that you’ve either moved the camera quicker than Wallace did or you used a slower shutter speed.  I thought you deserve a lot of credit for being so brave to enter ICM image in a camera club competition as they’re so different from the run of mill entries and throw judges off balance. I don’t think they know how to judge them so just give a mediocre mark.

    I like your photo and think it looks like a pencil sketch. I think we’ve all seen this type of image in an art gallery selling for hundreds of pounds!

    #16555

    Paul Hill
    Participant

    I will be entering more ICM images next season, I’m determined to find a judge that does like them. It is a very hit or miss technique….well more like miss,miss,miss,miss,miss,miss,HIT.

    I attempted some seascapes using ICM (horizontal movement) in Scotland on our recent holiday but I’m not happy with any of them. I will be trying again in Cornwall in August. If I get a good one it may be entered this year.

    #16567

    KEN LAST
    Participant

    Cannot say the theme grabs me but each to there own. Used to experiment with camera on a revolving gramaphone turntable.  Things like  on a short time exposure and in a darkened room and flashing the light on and off as revolving.Everyone can do this.Fix camera to front light bracket on your bicycle and take   short time exposures as cycling in traffic. Keep up with those in front and they will be fairly sharp.Traffic coming to you and all roadside is blurred. You could  do this on a horse except they do not have light brackets.

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